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Research Applications

Medical universities, personal care product manufacturers and clinical research organizations all routinely use the VivaScope in their scientific studies for basic and clinical research, product development and efficacy and claims validation. This has resulted in more than 380 peer-reviewed studies published in leading medical and scientific journals around the world.

Caliber I.D. offers several configurations of the standard confocal scanning engine for use in these types of research-specific environments:

 

Caliber I.D.'s VivaScope 1500The VivaScope 1500 makes it possible to capture confocal images that depict cellular structures of living tissue in real-time, without the need for complex and lengthy preparation protocols and without invasive surgical biopsies. The same area of interest can be captured by the integrated dermatoscopic camera and may be imaged repeatedly over time to access both clinical and sub-clinical changes.
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Caliber I.D.'s VivaScope 3000The VivaScope 3000 is the world’s first commercially available hand-held in vivo reflectance confocal microscope for skin imaging. This imaging tool simplifies examination of difficult-to-access regions of the skin, and is particularly useful for imaging facial lesions; all the while delivering the stable, repeatable, high quality cellular-resolution images that researchers and clinicians around the world have come to rely on.
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Caliber I.D.'s VivaScope 1500 MultilaserThe VivaScope 1500 Multilaser combines the reflectance capability of the VivaScope 1500 with the ability to perform fluorescence-based imaging. Skin can be viewed in vivo in either mode at 785 nm (infrared), 658 nm (red) and 488 nm (blue). Standard filters for fluorescein, methylene blue and indocyanine green are included. Additional filter sets may be available for your particular application.
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Caliber I.D.'s VivaScope 2500The VivaScope 2500 is configured for ex vivo use, however the tissue does not require any complex preparation or preservation procedures. Excised tissue and small animals, such as xenograft mouse models, can be imaged with 830 nm (infrared), 658 nm (red) and 488 nm (blue). Spectral filtering can be optimized for applications such as the excitation of green fluorescent protein (GFP).
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